Apr. 30th, 2016

jyrgenn: Blurred head shot from 2007 (Default)
Just for fun I timed a program that I have developed in my spare time, the Lisp interpreter lingo, written in Go, on a number of computers. This measures basically single-thread performance, presumably with some emphasis on memory access, as the interpreter does a lot of pointer chasing. Mainly I wanted to compare my newly upgraded home server mellum with others.

The first four of the computers listed in the table are my own, the first three at home, the fourth an external rented server. All others are my employer's and are operated by our group.

 

Hostevals/sFactorCPU(s)CoresClock/GhzOS
mellum35057151.00E3-1220 v343.1FreeBSD 10.3
naibel4971927.05T40E APU21FreeBSD 10.3
wrixum16591912.11Core 2 Duo22.4OS X 10.11.4
holt18490071.90Opteron 138542.7Debian Jessie
Brunei13756742.55E5-2620 v3122.4Debian Jessie
Island15480872.26X5650122.67Debian Jessie
Bermuda21399851.64i5-240043.1Debian Jessie
qcm0516227772.16E5-2690 v2203Debian Jessie
qcm0613554492.59E5-2690 v3242.6Debian Jessie
qcm0713915232.52E5-2690 v3242.6Debian Jessie
qcw5041664560.84i5-459043.3Debian Jessie
dgm0714736662.38X5650122.7Debian Wheezy

 

The listed number of cores is the total in the machine, without hyperthreading.

The program I ran is the interpreter lingo, commit 5aa9fa8cd136efd05e0adcbb9474f0aa6fe1fe64, built with the current Go 1.6.2 – to be precise, a run of make benchmark10 in the lingo directory, which factorises the number 100000000001 with the (rather naïvely implemented) Lisp program factor.lisp.

The number at "evals/s" states how many Lisp expressions have been evaluated per second. I have used the best number of a few runs each (at least two). Apart from qcm05 and qcm07 the machines were very lightly loaded, such that each had a "free" CPU.

I am a bit surprised that, apart from the workstation qcw50, my computer with a relatively cheap and nearly three-year-old CPU comes out ahead of nearly everything I could get my hands on, and not only the old ones (Island, our workgroup server, and Bermuda, my workstation), but also the newer ones. Now that computer has only one CPU and only four cores in total; especially the qcm0[5-7], meant for serious number crunching, have much more. Still amazing.

But I am even more surprised that my oldish MacBook Pro wrixum (13", mid-2010) keeps itself up so bravely. It has not only a CPU design from nearly eight years ago, but was also the slowest of the product line when I bought it.


Update: an additional result from rbarclay (see comments)

Update: More results are welcome! If you want to build from source, look into the comments for detailed instructions. If you want to use a pre-built binary for FreeBSD, Linux, or OS X on the amd64 architecture, download the appropriate one of the following files, unpack it, change into the lingo directory, and run <code>make benchmark10</code>. See the output for the "evals/s" value.

additional results
Sourceevals/sFactorCPU(s)CoresClock/GHzOS
rbarclay28504421.23FX-835084Debian Jessie
Update: An article Modern Microprocessors – A 90 Minute Guide! by Jason Robert Carey Patterson is interesting in this context.
 

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